Should carseats be in the middle or side?

Is it best to put car seat in middle?

The majority of crashes are frontal impact crashes. Being in the center rear seat is most beneficial of the more rare but more dangerous side impact crashes. Being in a rear-facing car seat is safer if the crash is front impact as the child’s head, neck and back are all being supported during the crash.

Does the car seat go behind driver or passenger?

The car seat should always be installed in the back seat. That is the safest spot for your baby. If you can, put the car seat in the center seat. If not, it is fine behind either the driver or passenger side.

Which side should a baby car seat be on?

We’re here to help you to decide the best position for your car seat:

  1. Rear Middle: The Safest Spot! The safest place for your car seat is the rear middle seat due to its maximum distance from passenger-side air bags and any potential impact. …
  2. Rear Passenger. …
  3. Rear Driver. …
  4. Front Passenger.

How long should you ride in the back with your baby?

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that infants and toddlers ride in a rear-facing seat until they are 2 years old or until they have reached the maximum weight and height limits recommended by the manufacturer.

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Can a child sit in the middle seat?

If the middle rear seat has a three-point (lap and diagonal) seat belt, this is the safest place to put a child restraint (unless the manufacturer’s instructions say one of the other seats is better) because it is the furthest away from the sides of the car. … Most child car seats require a three-point seat belt.

When can a baby be in a car seat longer than 2 hours?

Many car seat manufacturers recommend that a baby should not be in a car seat for longer than 2 hours, within a 24 hour time period. This is because when a baby is in a semi-upright position for a prolonged period of time it can result in: 1. A strain on the baby’s still-developing spine.